Ask any photographer (professional, amateur, or casual shooter) what photography means to them, and you’ll get as many answers as there are stars in the sky. This is a good thing. This means that fifty people can be taking the same shot of a single scene and almost all of them will come up with their own unique take on it.

Photography like any art is broken down into two aspects. You have the nuts and bolts discussion on how to use the camera, and how far you can stress the camera to get the shot you want. The other part is the crafting an image to bring out a reaction from the viewer. Without the former skills under your belt the latter becomes much harder.

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People have inquired how I manage my photos after they hear that I can easily shoot an upward of 600 to 1000 shots in a single visit to a zoo or wild park. Even when you consider that on an average I delete a third to a half of the shots due to duplications (I shoot in continuous mode), focusing issues, bad cropping, animal walks behind a tree, shooting from the hip failures, wrong camera settings (this is the largest category), etc. It still leaves 300 to 700 pictures which can be daunting to those who may take only thirty pictures a year and still can’t find the shots they want a few years later.

So today I’m going to walk through my keywording process, and explain how it improves my life. I hope by time you are finished it will inspire you in how you can improve your current photo management.

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Before I start writing I need to state two things. First off, I’m glad to see that Mr Rothman finally able able to produce Jathia’s Wager. Second is a disclaimer; I wrote the first complete draft of Jathia’s Wager referred to as “The Love Story Envisioning”. This means I had some vested interest in the project back when it started in early 2007.

Now, let me get to the heart of this post. The final film has the same issues that the original seven page partial draft written by Mr Rothman had. There is no plot, no driving force, and no reason to empathize with the main characters. The sad thing is because what I saw in that partial draft was a deeper meaning than what Mr Rothman decided to portray. However, with the summary below it doesn’t surprise me it was lost.

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“An object in motion will stay in motion until acted on by an outside force.” – Newton’s First Law of Motion.

This doesn’t apply just to objects, but to writers as well. Once a writer has been shoved hard enough in the right direction, he/she will continue down that path until something slows or stops them. For physical objects that tends to be friction, but for writers it could be anything–real life, sickness, lack of energy, depression, self-loathing, etc.

Now, that I have you thinking. Let me change gears slightly. Frankly, the idea of inertia isn’t interesting to me, nor will be the focus of today’s topic. But it’s the concept of creating that inertia in the first place.

As you can tell, I’ve lost all inertia. Not only on this website, on my home website, and on a writing project tentatively due at the end of March (which I blew). The energy required for me to write or edit is high (editing is the worse of the two). It isn’t that I’m lazy or I feel as if I suck at the task. It has more to do with my distractibility.

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A consistent set of world rules is a requirement when you sit down to write a story, and the rules you have will depends on the length of the piece. There is nothing worse than reading a book that conflicts with itself (Well that is a lie, but go with me. I’ll talk about other important things in later articles).

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